Concerned Husband

concernedhusband

1 Posts
Reply Posted on: Jun 28, 2012 at 8:38pm
My wife and I are extremely confused. Would you please help us? You seem to be the doctor people turn to when they need anwers in this area.

My wife had extensive immune testing (seems like every test known to man) and was found to be homozygous for mthfr a1298c (no other issues found). We were told that this is not a big deal and that it would be more of an issue if she had been found to be homozygous for mthfr c677t. However, in my online research, many suggest that the "a" mutation is just as concerning and should be treated with meds. After a few ivf failures (no implantation) and no answers after extensive testing, we want to do whatever it takes to be successful.

Question 1: In your opinion, is the double "a" mutation less concerning than the double "c" mutation?

Question 2: My wife's other polymorphism tests came back fine - do you think it would be worthwhile having her tested for the pai and factor xiii tests (the only tests she didn't have done)?

Many thanks.

Dr. Braverman

2024 Posts
RE: Concerned Husband Posted on: Jul 2, 2012 at 10:46am
The A mutation is known more for causing genetic defects due to issues with folic acid metabolism and we use Metanx for this. I would doubt its the issue you have but it is still on the list of possible explaantions albeit low on the list.

Yes the PAI - 1 and XIII are also on the list and should be completed.

Lastly when most of my patietns say (extensive) immune testing I generally find it was extensive based on the expereince fo the doctor drawing them and rarely covers all the issues I would look at.

I hope this helps.
Dr. Jeffrey Braverman MD FACOG
Medical Director
Braverman Reproductive Immunology P.C.

Dr. Braverman

2024 Posts
RE: Concerned Husband Posted on: Jul 2, 2012 at 10:46am
The A mutation is known more for causing genetic defects due to issues with folic acid metabolism and we use Metanx for this. I would doubt its the issue you have but it is still on the list of possible explaantions albeit low on the list.

Yes the PAI - 1 and XIII are also on the list and should be completed.

Lastly when most of my patietns say (extensive) immune testing I generally find it was extensive based on the expereince fo the doctor drawing them and rarely covers all the issues I would look at.

I hope this helps.
Dr. Jeffrey Braverman MD FACOG
Medical Director
Braverman Reproductive Immunology P.C.