Question about HLA C

any time now

7 Posts
Reply Posted on: Jul 2, 2012 at 10:29pm
Just read the below entry on your blog regarding HLA C. My concern is that my wife and I have 1 HLA C match, which would make us a partial match. We also have one other partial HLA DQ Alpha match, but have been told that doesn't matter so much.

What about this HLA C match you discuss below? Since we are a partial match, that would mean that 50% of the time the embryo will have an HLA C that matches my wife (according to the law of probability). Assuming that's correct, would that mean that 50% of the time the embryo may be rejected because of this match? If that's also correct, what would/should we do to address this HLA C partial match? You refer to an "immune therapy" below - which one?

BTW - my wife's natural killer, cytokine, reproductive immunophenos, autoimmunes and thrombos are nicely within range (no abnormalities) and don't need to be treated. But this HLA C partial match is concerning us. Please help us to better understand this. Thanks.HLA C significance of matching your partnerPosted on Oct 6, 2010 5:05pm MDTNew literature confirms what we have already posted on this site. In this issue of Reproductive Immunology researchers have again found that the embryo's HLA C molecule on the surface of its trophoblast must be different than the HLA C molecule on the mothers NK cells. When they are different the NK cells are deactivated , but when they match the NK cells do not get deactivated and attack the embryo. Patients that are complete matches(husband and wife) on the HLA C gene that we test for(everyone has 2 , one from each of thier parents), have always shown evidence of immune rejections which supports this current literature. Fortunately , this problem responds well to immune therapy.

Dr. Braverman

2004 Posts
RE: Question about HLA C Posted on: Jul 3, 2012 at 9:11am
We have been following the issue of partial HLA C matches for sometime now at our center. We have not found it to be a significant issue, if no other etiologies for losses are seen , we may at times treat this however. But as a rule we do not find it an issue. Its most likely the fact that HLA C matched embryos "may" not implant , but when they dont match they do so most probably never even know about those that did not.
Dr. Jeffrey Braverman MD FACOG
Medical Director
Braverman Reproductive Immunology P.C.

any time now

7 Posts
Reply RE: Question about HLA C Posted on: Jul 3, 2012 at 2:37pm
Based on your above response, we will need to start seeing you so that we can be treated for our HLA C match. As mentioned, my wife had full immune testing (nk assays - twice, cytokine ratios, reprod immunophenos, all autoimmunes - some of them twice, all inherited thrombos & coagulation defects, hla matching, and more) - all were within normal ranges. The only concern is the hla matching...

HLA C: 07,07 (my wife), 07, 04 (me)
HLA DQ Alpha: 4.1, 4.1 (my wife), 4.1, 1.1 (me)

We have 1 child together, but haven't been successful since - not even with ivfs. Since there are literally no other abnormalities that can be identified, we think the HLA C match may be our problem.

Before we set anything up with your office, we are eager to know what the "typical" treatment would be for an HLA C match such as ours (with all other things normal). Please give us the name(s) of the treatment(s) or medication(s) so we can research it beforehand.

Appreciate your time and effort. Look forward to speaking with you soon.

Dr. Braverman

2004 Posts
RE: Question about HLA C Posted on: Jul 3, 2012 at 2:47pm
Best would be to call and set up a brief consult (no charge) to quickly discuss these issues. If you are local then better to come in. I will go over all this with you on the phone.
Dr. Jeffrey Braverman MD FACOG
Medical Director
Braverman Reproductive Immunology P.C.

Dr. Braverman

2004 Posts
RE: Question about HLA C Posted on: Jul 3, 2012 at 2:47pm
Best would be to call and set up a brief consult (no charge) to quickly discuss these issues. If you are local then better to come in. I will go over all this with you on the phone.
Dr. Jeffrey Braverman MD FACOG
Medical Director
Braverman Reproductive Immunology P.C.